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Looking for Kirlian in entire archive - Found 31 matches in 16 files
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Kirlian Photography, 18/3/2003
Kirlian Photography

Kirlian Photography

Kirlian photography allegedly depicts the body's "aura," a so-called "human energy field" that is said to be not ordinarily visible. During the procedure, the object, such as a person's hand, is placed on a photographic emulsion within an apparatus that generates a high-voltage (15,000 to 100,000 volts), low-amperage, high-frequency electric current. The resulting photo shows a fuzzy glow surrounding the outline of the object. Proponents correlate these patterns with acupuncture meridians and claim that "auric" qualities reveal changes in health and emotional state. Kirlian photography has also been claimed useful for demonstrating changes before and after chiropractic spinal manipulation. However, scientific investigators have shown that Kirlian effects depend on physical factors that are well understood.

Kirlian photography is named after Semyon Davidovich Kirlian (1900-1980), a Russian electrician who observed that an electric spark can "take its own picture" as it passes through a photographic emulsion. This phenomenon had been well known to physicists and electrical engineers since the earliest days of photography. But in 1939, Kirlian proclaimed that he was photographing a supernatural human energy field.

The Kirlian photographic process requires a high-voltage, high-frequency, alternating current supply. The basic process -- a corona discharge phenomenon -- occurs when an electrically grounded object discharges sparks between itself and an electrode generating the electrical field . Two set-ups can be used to take Kirlian photographs.

Kirlian himself did not understand the involved science. To him, the "fuzzy" field surrounding any object was a photograph of its "aura." He was ignored by Russian scientists, but during the early 1960s the Russian press and popular magazines promoted him as a "great discoverer." American and European journalists and pseudoscientists flocked to see him and returned home ready to "study the aura" and "probe the bioenergy field."

Kirlian photography is alleged to detect all types of disease (even before physical signs appear) and emotional states. Many "energy healers," "clairvoyants," and other occult practitioners still rely on it today. "Supernaturally gifted" people are claimed to generate unusually dramatic photos. However, scientific investigation has found that the outcome depends on the type of film, the voltage, the skin resistance (which can be affected by perspiration and the amount of pressure of the finger on the film), how well the subject is electrically grounded, the humidity of the room, the exposure time, the photographic development time, and even the order of the photograph in a series . Moreover, coins and water droplets can generate Kirlian "auras" as effectively as living things. In fact, at least 22 physical, chemical, and photochemical characteristics can influence the coronal discharges seen in Kirlian photos.

Coker G. Kirlian photography and the "aura." ASTOP fact sheet, 1983.

Watkins AJ, Bickel WS. A study of the Kirlian effect. The Skeptical Inquirer 10:244-257, 1986.

Watkins AJ, Bickel WS. The Kirlian technique: Controlling the wild cards. The Skeptical Inquirer 13:172-184, 1989.

Misleading Claims for Seasilver™, 15/9/2005
Many Seasilver distributors have claimed Kirlian photography has demonstrated that Seasilver effects the person's "energy field." Many Web sites have shown Kirlian photographs taken before and after taking Seasilver. However, Kirlian photography does not measure "energy fields." During this procedure an object such as a person's hand is placed on photographic paper or film in an apparatus that generates a high-voltage, low-amperage, high-frequency electric current. The film is then exposed by air glow that occurs when electrical discharges pass between the subject and apparatus through the photographic material. Investigators have demonstrated that the pictures reflect the amount of perspiration, finger pressure applied to the camera, and about 20 other factors .

Seasilver and Kirlian photography. Sea Vegetation Web site, accessed March 18, 2003.

Barrett S. Kirlian photography. Quackwatch, June 2, 2001.

Unnaturalistic Methods: A, 25/3/2007
aura analysis (aura reading, auric diagnosis): Supposed direct or indirect examination of the "vital energy" that allegedly envelops each human. Proponents claim that this "aura" is perceptible to clairvoyants or psychics. "Nonpsychics" purportedly can analyze it through Kirlian photography or a Kilner screen. Dr. Walter J. Kilner (1847-1920) of St. Thomas's Hospital, in London, invented this screen: two plates of glass, an eighth of an inch apart, containing an alcoholic solution of a dye (usually carmine or a coal-tar dye). "Auric" colors supposedly reveal the personal traits of the subject, such as impressionableness and "spiritual arrogance." Proponents also associate "auric" colors with glands, organs, organ systems, and psychological states such as anger and boredom.

Aura Imaging Photography (Aura Imaging): Variation of Kirlian photography promoted by Johannes R. Fisslinger, the German author of Aura Imaging Photography, Aura Mastery, and Aura Visions, and by "researcher" Guy Coggins, author of Aura Awareness: What Your Aura Says About You. Aura Imaging is a purported means of reading the "true character" of individuals. It involves using an "aura camera" that can produce instant photos. The color, shape, and size of the "auric image" allegedly can indicate specific physical, emotional, and spiritual conditions. Aura Imaging theory posits chakras ("energy centers" that correspond to endocrine glands) and "vital energy."

aura analysis (aura reading, auric diagnosis): Supposed direct or indirect examination of the "vital energy" that allegedly envelops each human. Proponents claim that this "aura" is perceptible to clairvoyants or psychics. "Nonpsychics" purportedly can analyze it through Kirlian photography or a Kilner screen. Dr. Walter J. Kilner (1847-1920) of St. Thomas's Hospital, in London, invented this screen: two plates of glass, an eighth of an inch apart, containing an alcoholic solution of a dye (usually carmine or a coal-tar dye). "Auric" colors supposedly reveal the personal traits of the subject, such as impressionableness and "spiritual arrogance." Proponents also associate "auric" colors with glands, organs, organ systems, and psychological states such as anger and boredom.

Aura Imaging Photography (Aura Imaging): Variation of Kirlian photography promoted by Johannes R. Fisslinger, the German author of Aura Imaging Photography, Aura Mastery, and Aura Visions, and by "researcher" Guy Coggins, author of Aura Awareness: What Your Aura Says About You.

Unnaturalistic Methods Glossary, 4/6/1997
Kirlian photography (corona-discharge photography, electrography): Purported means of recording one's aura (see above). Soviet electrician Semyon Davidovich Kirlian and his wife, Valentina, developed Kirlian photography in the early 1940s.

aura (energy field work, Kirlian diagnosis)

Unnaturalistic Methods: J-K, 4/6/1997
Kirlian diagnosis (Kirlian technique): Form of aura analysis based on Kirlian photography.

Index of Questionable Treatments, 13/8/2014
Kirlian Energy Emission Analysis

Dubious Diagnostic Tests, 16/12/2013
Kirlian photography

Questionable Device Index, 22/3/2013
Kirlian Photography

Unnaturalistic Methods: C, 3/7/2009
Colorpuncture (Colorpuncture system, Osho Esogetic Colorpuncture system, Lightpuncture, Osho Lightpuncture): Combination of "Energy Emission analysis" (Kirlian photography) and a form of color therapy.

The National Academy of Research Biochemists, 26/5/2009
Roberta Lee, DD, PhD, ND, who is said to have been a "special consultant to the United States Army in studies relating to Kirlian Photography and stress-induced situations."

Unnaturalistic Methods: O, 10/1/2007
occult medicine: Field that apparently encompasses astrology, aura analysis, biorhythm, Christian Science, clairvoyant diagnosis, faith healing, Kirlian photography, medical graphology, mesmerism, palmistry, shamanism, TCM, and witchcraft.

OTA Report: Pharmacologic and Biologic Treatments, 13/1/2006
In addition to prescribing some or all of these agents, Nieper cautions patients to avoid alternating current fields, such as electric blankets and heating pads, and to avoid all cigarette smoke. He recommends that they follow a special diet —a low-salt, low-carbohydrate, "Kirlian- positive vegetarian diet," including whole grain cereals and breads, carrot juice with heavy cream, vegetable and fruit juices, low-fat milk, all types of vegetables and fruits, moderate amounts of coffee, tea, eggs, and butter, and limited amounts of fish. Patients are cautioned to avoid most types of meat, sausage, chicken, veal, shellfish, sugar, alcohol (except "sour" wine), white bread, cheese, vitamin B12, and iron (167).

Distinguishing Science and Pseudoscience, 24/11/2005
There are fads, and a pseudoscientist may switch from one fad to another (from ghosts to ESP research, from flying saucers to psychic studies, from ESP research to looking for Bigfoot). But within a given topic, no progress is made. Little or no new information or uncovered. New theories are seldom proposed, and old concepts are rarely modified or discarded in light of new "discoveries," since pseudoscience rarely makes new "discoveries." The older the idea, the more respect it receives. No natural phenomena or processes previously unknown to science have ever been discovered by pseudoscientists. Indeed, pseudoscientists almost invariably deal with phenomena well known to scientists, but little known to the general public—so that the public will swallow whatever the pseudoscientist wants to claim. Examples include firewalking and "Kirlian" photography.

Some Notes on Jean Drisko, M.D., 15/1/2005
Drisko is listed as a staff member of the Center For the Improvement of Human Functioning International, a "medical, research and educational organization" in Wichita, Kansas. She is also listed as research director of its affiliated Olive W. Garvey Center for Healing Arts. The company's Web site states that the "scientists" at its Bio-Communications Research Institute. "are dedicated to biomedical research and education, including . . . subtle energies." The center's laboratory offers hair analysis (a cardinal sign of quackery), cytotoxic food sensitivity testing (banned by the FDA), and several other nonstandard tests. The center's store sells such notable products as Aller-Bee-Gone (a bee pollen product for allergies); blue-green algae; colloidal silver (risk without benefit) ; kava (FDA warning issued); thymic protein; and Alacer's "Miracle Water." The center also offers to teach others about auriculotherapy (acupuncture variant in which needling points on the ear is claimed to influence organs throughout the body), Kirlian photography (which has no useful medical applications), and "specific cancer cell culture techniques used to determine optimum vitamin C rates of intravenous infusions." (High-dose vitamin C is not effective against cancer.) ACAM's December 2002 newsletter urged its members to nominate Drisko to the IOM CAM panel.

Unnaturalistic Methods: U-Z, 4/6/1997
vibrational medicine (energetic medicine, energetics medicine, energy medicine, subtle-energy medicine, vibrational healing, vibrational therapies): "Healing philosophy" whose main "tenet" is that humans are "dynamic energy systems" ("body/mind/spirit" complexes) and reflect "evolutionary patterns" of "soul growth." Its premises include the following. (a) Health and illness originate in "subtle energy systems." (b) These systems coordinate the "life-force" and the "physical body." (c) Emotions, spirituality, and nutritional and environmental factors affect the "subtle energy systems." Vibrational medicine embraces acupuncture, aromatherapy, Bach flower therapy, "chakra rebalancing," channeling, color breathing, color therapy, crystal healing, absent healing, Electroacupuncture According to Voll (EAV), etheric touch, flower essence therapy, homeopathy, Kirlian photography, laserpuncture, the laying on of hands, meridian therapy, mesmerism, moxibustion, orthomolecular medicine, Past-life Regression, Polarity Therapy, psychic healing, psychic surgery, radionics, the Simonton method, sonopuncture, Toning, Transcendental Meditation, and Therapeutic Touch.

Unnaturalistic Methods: E, 4/6/1997
electrocrystal therapy: Form of crystal healing developed by British "researcher" Harry Oldfield in the 1970s. Its theory posits chakras and "meridians." Oldfield also developed polycontrast interface photography (PIP), a "diagnostic aid" that is a video variation of Kirlian photography.

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