Webglimpse Search Results:

Looking for candles in entire archive - Found 43 matches in 11 files
Showing results 1 - 11


Why Ear Candling Is Not a Good Idea, 19/5/2010
Most ear candles sold in the United States are manufactured here or in Canada and retail for between $2 and $10. They can be made of linen or cotton (often unbleached, as practitioners claim that chlorine is bad for the ears) soaked in wax or paraffin and allowed to harden. (Ironically, one manufacturer uses only pure beeswax, claiming that paraffin is carcinogenic.). Some candles are colored, which is controversial in ear-candling circles, though the color of pure beeswax varies. Home varieties include wax-soaked newspaper and cones of pottery into which herbal smoke is blown. Some waxes contain herbs or other substances, including sage, chamomile, rose, rosemary, burdock root, osha root, periwinkle, jojoba, quassia bark, yucca root, or honey. White Egret, Inc., of Dallas, Texas, offers candles, plate guards, a 73-page manual, a 30-minute videotape, flame-retardant cloths, ear oil, and an otoscope. Its wholesale flyer states that its candles are "for entertainment only" and that its kits "supply you with everything you need for a safe and effective session of entertainment."

After the show, Long bought a package of ear candles at a local health-food store and, with help from a friend, carefully followed the package directions. She found that the candling produced a hissing sound similar to that of a conch shell held against the ear, but much louder. However, the air inside her ear became so hot that she had to stop the experiment.

More recently, two investigators tested candles to see whether the wax accumulated after burning came entirely from the candle or included wax that came from the ear. To do this they burned candles with the tip (a) inside the ear, (b) outside the ear, so the wax dripped into a bowl of water, and (b) inside the ear but with a tube in place that would permit ear wax to move into the tube but would block candle wax from moving downward. They demonstrated that all residue originated from the candle and that no ear wax was removed from the ear .

Candling poses several dangers, the most serious of which involve burning caused by the hot wax. Candle manufacturers claim that their candles will drip only down the outside of the ear, but shamefully few direct the user to hold the candle horizontally to prevent this. A 1996 survey of 144 ear, nose, and throat physicians, found that 14 had seen patients who had been harmed by ear candling, including at least 13 cases of external burns, 7 cases of ear canal obstruction with candle wax, and 1 perforated eardrum .

Candles marketed with health claims are classified by the FDA as medical devices. As such, they are illegal to market without FDA approval, which none of them have. During the past few years, the agency has banned the importation of auricular candles marketed by at least four Canadian companies :

Kencayd Consulting (aka Candela Ear Candles), Victoria, British Columbia, which had claimed that its products promoted better hearing, better lymphatic circulation, and pressure regulation.

In 1993, the FDA seized about $6,000 worth of candles, components, and brochures from Quality Health Products, of Fayette, Ohio. An FDA summary stated:

Early in 1998, the FDA ordered the president of Earth Care, of Ukiah, California, to stop marketing the Ear Candles advertised in his company's catalog. The letter noted that the product had been advertised as a "remedy for earaches, sinus headaches, swimmer's ear, allergies, and hearing difficulty effectively removes impurities from the passages by drawing excess wax, yeast, fungus, and bacteria . . . from the sinuses and lymph glands." In September 1998, the agency issued an Import Alert which stated:

The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), has determined that "Ear Candles" are medical devices as defined by Section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (The Act). An Ear Candle is a hollow wax cylinder (about ten inches long) intended to remove excess ear wax. This is accomplished by lighting the top of the candle-like product, and allowing it to create a vacuum to draw wax and other impurities from the ear.

In November 1998, the FDA warned Nature's Way, of West Columbia, South Carolina, that it would be illegal to continue marketing ear candles because they are unapproved devices that would be dangerous to use as suggested in its catalog .

Ear candles cannot be legally sold in Canada. The Medical Devices Regulations of Canada's Food and Drug Act states that medical device of this type must be licensed by Therapeutic Products Programme of Health Canada before the product can be sold. No licenses have been granted for this product. Some promoters, in an attempt to avoid medical device regulations, advertise ear candles as being "for entertainment only". However, Health Canada considers that this product is sold for medical purposes, because there is no other reasonable use for ear candles. Canada has issued directives prohibiting the importation ear candles .

In February 2010, the FDA sent warning letters to 15 companies: King Cone International; Indian Mountain Center; Bobalee Originals Manufacturing; International Ear Candle, LLC; Home Remedies Solutions; Harmony Cone; A..J.'s Candles Inc; Wholistic Health Solutions; Wally's Natural Products Inc.; Body Tools; Health, Wealth, & Happiness; White Egret, Inc.; Brennan & McCoy; Amasha; Unisource; and Herbs, Heirlooms and Homebrew. Some had promoted the products for use in children as well as adults.

Despite these actions, ear candles are still widely available through the Internet and at health-food stores. From 1998 through 2005, the Awareness Institute of Lake Wales, Florida, not only sold products but even offered an inexpensive correspondence course leading to "certification as an earconolgist."

Kaushall PP, Kaushall JN. On ear cones and candles. Skeptical Inquirer 24(5):12-13, 2000.

Seely DR, Quigley SM , Langman AW. Ear candles: Efficacy and safety. Laryngoscope 106:1226-1229, 1996.

FDA Import Alert #77-01. Detention without Physical Examination of Ear Candles. Sept 1, 1998.

I had temporary hearing loss for several weeks due to one use of ear candles. My normal hearing is excellent. After using the ear candles a hearing test showed that my hearing had dropped to below normal hearing levels! After a month of treatment and a lot of ear pain, my hearing finally returned to it's normal level.

Why Ear Candling Is Not a Good Idea, 19/5/2010
Most ear candles sold in the United States are manufactured here or in Canada and retail for between $2 and $10. They can be made of linen or cotton (often unbleached, as practitioners claim that chlorine is bad for the ears) soaked in wax or paraffin and allowed to harden. (Ironically, one manufacturer uses only pure beeswax, claiming that paraffin is carcinogenic.). Some candles are colored, which is controversial in ear-candling circles, though the color of pure beeswax varies. Home varieties include wax-soaked newspaper and cones of pottery into which herbal smoke is blown. Some waxes contain herbs or other substances, including sage, chamomile, rose, rosemary, burdock root, osha root, periwinkle, jojoba, quassia bark, yucca root, or honey. White Egret, Inc., of Dallas, Texas, offers candles, plate guards, a 73-page manual, a 30-minute videotape, flame-retardant cloths, ear oil, and an otoscope. Its wholesale flyer states that its candles are "for entertainment only" and that its kits "supply you with everything you need for a safe and effective session of entertainment."

After the show, Long bought a package of ear candles at a local health-food store and, with help from a friend, carefully followed the package directions. She found that the candling produced a hissing sound similar to that of a conch shell held against the ear, but much louder. However, the air inside her ear became so hot that she had to stop the experiment.

More recently, two investigators tested candles to see whether the wax accumulated after burning came entirely from the candle or included wax that came from the ear. To do this they burned candles with the tip (a) inside the ear, (b) outside the ear, so the wax dripped into a bowl of water, and (b) inside the ear but with a tube in place that would permit ear wax to move into the tube but would block candle wax from moving downward. They demonstrated that all residue originated from the candle and that no ear wax was removed from the ear .

Candling poses several dangers, the most serious of which involve burning caused by the hot wax. Candle manufacturers claim that their candles will drip only down the outside of the ear, but shamefully few direct the user to hold the candle horizontally to prevent this. A 1996 survey of 144 ear, nose, and throat physicians, found that 14 had seen patients who had been harmed by ear candling, including at least 13 cases of external burns, 7 cases of ear canal obstruction with candle wax, and 1 perforated eardrum .

Candles marketed with health claims are classified by the FDA as medical devices. As such, they are illegal to market without FDA approval, which none of them have. During the past few years, the agency has banned the importation of auricular candles marketed by at least four Canadian companies :

Kencayd Consulting (aka Candela Ear Candles), Victoria, British Columbia, which had claimed that its products promoted better hearing, better lymphatic circulation, and pressure regulation.

In 1993, the FDA seized about $6,000 worth of candles, components, and brochures from Quality Health Products, of Fayette, Ohio. An FDA summary stated:

Early in 1998, the FDA ordered the president of Earth Care, of Ukiah, California, to stop marketing the Ear Candles advertised in his company's catalog. The letter noted that the product had been advertised as a "remedy for earaches, sinus headaches, swimmer's ear, allergies, and hearing difficulty effectively removes impurities from the passages by drawing excess wax, yeast, fungus, and bacteria . . . from the sinuses and lymph glands." In September 1998, the agency issued an Import Alert which stated:

The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), has determined that "Ear Candles" are medical devices as defined by Section 201(h) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (The Act). An Ear Candle is a hollow wax cylinder (about ten inches long) intended to remove excess ear wax. This is accomplished by lighting the top of the candle-like product, and allowing it to create a vacuum to draw wax and other impurities from the ear.

In November 1998, the FDA warned Nature's Way, of West Columbia, South Carolina, that it would be illegal to continue marketing ear candles because they are unapproved devices that would be dangerous to use as suggested in its catalog .

Ear candles cannot be legally sold in Canada. The Medical Devices Regulations of Canada's Food and Drug Act states that medical device of this type must be licensed by Therapeutic Products Programme of Health Canada before the product can be sold. No licenses have been granted for this product. Some promoters, in an attempt to avoid medical device regulations, advertise ear candles as being "for entertainment only". However, Health Canada considers that this product is sold for medical purposes, because there is no other reasonable use for ear candles. Canada has issued directives prohibiting the importation ear candles .

In February 2010, the FDA sent warning letters to 15 companies: King Cone International; Indian Mountain Center; Bobalee Originals Manufacturing; International Ear Candle, LLC; Home Remedies Solutions; Harmony Cone; A..J.'s Candles Inc; Wholistic Health Solutions; Wally's Natural Products Inc.; Body Tools; Health, Wealth, & Happiness; White Egret, Inc.; Brennan & McCoy; Amasha; Unisource; and Herbs, Heirlooms and Homebrew. Some had promoted the products for use in children as well as adults.

Despite these actions, ear candles are still widely available through the Internet and at health-food stores. From 1998 through 2005, the Awareness Institute of Lake Wales, Florida, not only sold products but even offered an inexpensive correspondence course leading to "certification as an earconolgist."

Kaushall PP, Kaushall JN. On ear cones and candles. Skeptical Inquirer 24(5):12-13, 2000.

Seely DR, Quigley SM , Langman AW. Ear candles: Efficacy and safety. Laryngoscope 106:1226-1229, 1996.

FDA Import Alert #77-01. Detention without Physical Examination of Ear Candles. Sept 1, 1998.

I had temporary hearing loss for several weeks due to one use of ear candles. My normal hearing is excellent. After using the ear candles a hearing test showed that my hearing had dropped to below normal hearing levels! After a month of treatment and a lot of ear pain, my hearing finally returned to it's normal level.

Questionable Device Index, 22/3/2013
Ear Candles

Massage Therapy: Riddled with Quackery, 19/10/2012
The oils are administered in small quantities through inhalation, massage, or other applications to the skin. Aromatherapy products include diffusers, lamps, pottery, candles, pendants, earrings, shampoos, skin creams, lotions, bath salts, and shower gels.

The Toadstool Millionaires: Chapter 3, 16/9/2006
Living in the day of a barter economy, the shrewd merchandiser accepted produce for patent medicines. Soon he was dealing in such things as tobacco and turpentine, peach brandy and rum, candles and castor oil. The scope of his nostrum sales required thousands of bottles, an article he had first required while vending blacking, so Dyott acquired, first, an interest in a glass works, and then full ownership of a large factory on the Delaware River near Philadelphia.

Questionable "Self-Help" Products, 14/11/2004
Aromatherapy involves the use of aromatic oils from plants to affect mood or promote health. The oils are administered in small quantities through inhalation, massage, or other applications to the skin. Aromatherapy products include diffusers, lamps, pottery, candles, pendants, earrings, shampoos, skin creams, lotions, bath salts, and shower gels. The aromatic oils are alleged to contain hormones, antibiotics, and antiseptics, and to represent the “life force,” “spirit,” or “soul” of the plant. Some proponents claim that aromatherapy is a complete medical system that can “revitalize cells,” strengthen defense mechanisms, and cure the cause of disease. Others promote the products as useful for sharpening mental function or coping with stress. Although pleasant odors may enhance a person’s effort to relax, there is no scientific evidence that they can improve mental function or influence the course of any disease . In 2000, in a false advertising case, a California court approved a consent agreement under which the manufacturer was barred from claiming that certain products would "sharpen the mind," "freshen the mind," "make the mind more alert," "create sustained intellectual power," "increase mental concentration, or "address the physical effects of stress."

Psychic for a Day: How I Learned Tarot Cards, Palm Reading, Astrology, and Mediumship in 24 Hours, 2/5/2003
Since sound stages can have a rather cold feel to them, and because the set-up for a successful psychic reading is vital to generate receptivity in subjects, I instructed the production staff to set up two comfortable chairs with a small table between them, with a lace cloth covering the table and candles on and around the table, all sitting on a beautiful Persian rug. Soft colored lighting and incense provided a "spiritual" backdrop.

Oxegen Bars: Is a Breath of Fresh Air Worth It?, 5/11/2002
Peppermint, bayberry, cranberry, wintergreen. Breath mints? Scented candles? No -- they're "flavors" of oxygen offered at your local oxygen bar. Since oxygen bars were introduced in the United States in the late 1990s, the trend has caught on, and customers are bellying up to bars around the country to sniff oxygen through a plastic hose (cannula) inserted into their nostrils.

Aromatherapy: Making Dollars Out Of Scents, 6/5/2002
They are alleged to contain hormones, vitamins, antibiotics, and antiseptics and to represent the "life force," "spirit," or "soul" of the plant . The oils are administered in small quantities through inhalation, massage, or other applications to the skin. Occasionally, a product is taken internally. The products include diffusers, lamps, pottery, candles, pendants, earrings, shampoos, skin creams, lotions, and bath salts, and shower gels. Health Foods Business estimated that the total of aromatherapy products sold through health-food stores was about $59 million in 1995 and $105 million in 1996.

NCAHF vs. Aroma Vera et al., 11/12/2000
(13) Aromatic candles named "Energy" tone the body.

Fibromyalgia: Improving through Fitness, 15/2/2000
Exercise can cause muscle soreness; and for us this is an understatement! Therefore, you need to have a full array of methods to make yourself feel better and keep going. I always end my workout by relaxing in a sauna. Massage helps some people tremendously. Strong muscle relaxants and analgesics, a TENS units, and heat packs can also make a big difference. A leisurely hot bath with candles, earplugs, and baby oil may bring any sort of day to a pleasant close. Always keep in mind that although our muscles may hurt like hell, using them will not injure them. Post-exercise soreness will decrease over time, especially if you respond to your body's signals and pace yourself. No doubt it will be hardest in the beginning, so stockpile your most effective modalities to keep your levels of pain and fatigue tolerable.

New Query: Rank by: