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Dubious "Yeast Allergies", 28/3/2011
Dubious "Yeast Allergies"

Dubious "Yeast Allergies"

Candida albicans (sometimes referred to as monilia) is a fungus normally present on the skin and in the mouth, intestinal tract, and vagina. Under certain conditions, it can multiply and infect the surface of the skin or mucous membranes. Such infections are usually minor, but serious and deeper infections can occur, especially in patients whose resistance has been weakened by immunosuppressant drugs and serious illnesses such as AIDS. However, some practitioners claim that even when clinical signs of infection are absent, yeast-related problems can cause or trigger multiple symptoms such as fatigue, irritability, constipation, diarrhea, abdominal bloating, mood swings, depression, anxiety, dizziness, unexpected weight gain, difficulty in concentrating, muscle and joint pain, cravings for sugar or alcoholic beverages, psoriasis, hives, respiratory and ear problems, menstrual problems, infertility, impotence, bladder infections, prostatitis, and "feeling bad all over." The list of symptoms is similar to that of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS).

According to its promoters—some of whom practice "clinical ecology"—one out of three Americans suffers from yeast-related illness, which they refer to as chronic candidiasis, candidiasis hypersensitivity, Candida-related complex, the yeast syndrome, yeast allergy, yeast overgrowth, or simply "Candida" or "yeast problem." Many clinical ecologists view this alleged problem as an underlying cause of MCS. It is also touted as an important factor in AIDS, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and schizophrenia, as well as "hypoglycemia," "mercury-amalgam toxicity" and at least twenty other conditions. In recent years, proponents have suggested that chronic fatigue syndrome and Candida infections are closely related . This article uses the term "candidiasis hypersensitivity" in quotation marks to indicate that neither infection nor actual allergy is present.

Crook, who died in October 2002, stated that he began treating and communicating about yeast problems in 1979 after reading one of Truss's papers. In 1983, he published the first edition of his book The Yeast Connection , which he said was inspired by a television appearance that drew 7,300 requests for further information. Two years later, he established the International Health Foundation to help respond to the requests he kept generating.

The Yeast Connection states: "If a careful check-up doesn't reveal the cause for your symptoms, and your medical history is typical, it's possible or even probable that your health problems are yeast-connected." The book also states that tests such as cultures don't help much in diagnosis because "Candida germs live in every person's body . . .

Crook claimed that the problem arises because "antibiotics kill 'friendly germs' while they're killing enemies, and when friendly germs are knocked out, yeast germs multiply. Diets rich in carbohydrates and yeasts, birth control pills, cortisone, and other drugs also stimulate yeast growth." He also claimed that the yeasts produce toxins that weaken the immune system, which is also adversely affected by nutritional deficiencies, sugar consumption, and exposure to environmental molds and chemicals.

A yeast problem should not be diagnosed without definite clinical signs of an infection. The signs of a local infection, for example, can include itching, soreness, rash, and a discharge.

Both of these drugs are expensive . In a double-blind trial, the antifungal drug nystatin did no better than a placebo in relieving systemic or psychological symptoms of "candidiasis hypersensitivity syndrome." A study of 100 consecutive chronic fatigue patients found no differences in historical, physical, or laboratory findings among those who believed their problem was yeast-related and those who did not .

All four mistakenly believed they had disseminated candidiasis and were taking nystatin or ketoconazole, which had been prescribed by their family physicians. All had read The Yeast Connection and had carried the book into the office during their visits.

Worse yet, a case has been reported of a child with a severe case of disseminated candidiasis who had been seen by a "Candida doctor" and given inadequate treatment. The report concluded that "the advice of yeast connection advocates may be inappropriate even for illnesses in which Candida is implicated."

The Yeast Connection contains a 70 or 90-item "candida questionnaire" and score sheet to determine how likely it is that health problems are yeast-connected. Crook has marketed several versions to physicians who accept his theories. The documents state,"if your point score is over 180, candida almost certainly plays a role in causing your health problems." Scores over 120 mean "candida probably plays a role," 60 to 120 means it "possibly plays a role," and scores under 60 mean it is "less apt" to play a significant roll.

Under federal law, any product intended for the prevention or treatment of disease is a drug, and it is illegal to market new drugs that do not have FDA approval. In 1989, the FDA's Health Fraud Branch issued instructions and a sample regulatory letter indicating that it was illegal to market vitamin products intended for treating yeast infections. In 1990, Nature's Way and its president, Kenneth Murdock, settled an FTC Complaint by signing a consent agreement to stop making unsubstantiated claims that Cantrol is helpful against yeast infections caused by Candida albicans.

Nature's Way promoted Cantrol with several versions of a self-test—one of which is pictured below—based on common symptoms the manufacturer claimed were associated with yeast problems.

The company also agreed to pay $30,000 to the National Institutes of Health to support research on yeast infections .

I believe that practitioners who diagnose nonexistent "yeast problems" should have their licenses revoked. Some apply this diagnosis to nearly every patient they see.

Yeast-related illness: Three interviews. The Human Ecologist, Winter 1992, pp. 9-11.

Crook, WG. The Yeast Connection: A Medical Breakthrough.

Renfro L and others. Yeast connection among 100 patients with chronic fatigue. American Journal of Medicine 86:165-168, 1989.

Quinn JP et al. Ketoconazole and the yeast connection. JAMA 255:3250, 1986.


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Index to FDA Warning Letters, 2/3/2008
Kabco, Inc., Amityville, N.Y. (9/26/01). Warning to company president Saiful Kinria that his company's cholesterol Support Capsules could not be marketed as a dietary supplement. The product, made from red yeast rice powder, contained a significant amount of lovastatin (the active ingredient in the cholesterol-lowering prescription drug Mevacor). For that reason, the letter stated, marketing is illegal without FDA approval as a drug.

The product, made from red yeast rice powder, contained a significant amount of lovastatin (the active ingredient in the cholesterol-lowering prescription drug Mevacor). For that reason, the letter stated, marketing is illegal without FDA approval as a drug.

Warning to company chairman and CEO Frank W. Gay that the company's KAL cholesterol Defense, Soloray Red Yeast Rice, and Soloway Guggul & Red Yeast Rice could not be marketed as dietary supplements because they contained a significant amount of lovastatin (the active ingredient in the cholesterol-lowering prescription drug Mevacor). For that reason, the letter stated, marketing is illegal without FDA approval as a drug.

could not be marketed as a dietary supplement. The product, made from red yeast rice powder, contained a significant amount of lovastatin (the active ingredient in the cholesterol-lowering prescription drug Mevacor). For that reason, the letter stated, marketing is illegal without FDA approval as a drug.

Maypro Industries, Purchase, N.Y. (5/8/01). Warning to company president Steve Yamada that the company's bulk red yeast rice powder could not be marketed as a dietary supplement because it contained a significant amount of lovastatin (the active ingredient in the cholesterol-lowering prescription drug Mevacor).

Written Submission by Rep. Dan Burton, 23/1/2003
Had the FDA not taken action to keep all red yeast products off the market, American seniors would have been able to choose a red yeast rice supplement instead of a prescription statin such as Bayocal. Earlier this year, the National Cholesterol Education Program - which is coordinated by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute - recommended aggressive treatment of high cholesterol in diabetes and high blood pressure patients through the use of statins. On August 8, 2001, Bayer removed the statin drug Bayocal (cerivastatin) from the U.S. market because of reports of a severe muscle adverse reaction, rhabdomyolysis, which was sometimes fatal.

In a multi-center clinical trial of red yeast rice in subjects with elevated cholesterol - 18% were judged to have adverse reactions possibly or probably related to Red Yeast Rice treatment. The reported adverse events were headache, abdominal bloating, and gas. The trial, which took place at 12 U.S. sites confirmed that treatment with a traditional Chinese food, red yeast rice, was well tolerated and was effective in reducing TC, LD-c, TG and ratio of TC:HDL-c, and in increasing HDL-c in patients with hyperlipidemia. The cost of a red yeast rice supplement is only 20 percent of the prescription drug. This translates to approximately $33.5 billion versus $ 5.5 billion annually for the affected Medicare population. As we consider a prescription drug benefit for Medicare, we must think about these options and look for ways to reduce our dependence on expensive prescription drugs.

Glenn Braswell's Advisors, 11/2/2013
Douglas Hunt, MD,* who practices in Burbank, California and has hosted a radio show. The directory of the American College for Advancement of Medicine (ACAM) lists his specialties as allergy, bariatrics, chelation therapy, hypoglycemia, metabolic medicine, nutrition, preventive medicine, and "yeast syndrome." (ACAM is a professional organization that promotes chelation therapy and many other dubious treatment methods. In1998, the FTC secured a consent agreement barring ACAM from making unsubstantiated advertising claims that chelation therapy is effective against atherosclerosis or any other disease of the circulatory system .)

Charles Anderson, MD, who practices in Essex Junction, Vermont, and is listed in the ACAM directory as specializing in allergy, family practice, nutrition, and "yeast syndrom."

Dennis Harper, DO, who practices in Utah, is listed in the ACAM directory as specializing in allergy, chelation therapy, osteopathic manipulation, and "yeast syndrome."

Cynthia Mervis Watson, MD, who practices in Rolling Hills, California, is listed in the ACAM directory as specializing in family practice, gynecology, nutrition, preventive medicine, pediatrics, and "yeast syndrome."

Contact Reflex Analysis Is Nonsense, 24/8/2014
Versendaal claimed that CRA can "test every conceivable condition in the human body . . . help that patient, and know how long it will take for that patient to get well." Testing is done by pulling on the patient's outstretched arm while placing one's finger or hand on one of about 75 "reflex" points on the patient's body. The nine main "reflexes" pictured below, are the "right master allergy reflex," "left master allergy reflex," "metabolic reflex," "master heart/blood quality reflex," "hemoglobin reflex," "coronary reflex," "virus reflex, and "yeast reflex." Others include the "parasite reflex," "vaginal tract reflex," "pineal gland reflex," "virus reflex," "blood quality reflex," "gouty arthritis reflex," "pus reflex," and "yeast infection reflex."

Yeast infections cause fibroids of the uterus and breast.

Be Wary of "Fad" Diagnoses, 13/5/2014
Yeast Allergy

"Candidiasis hypersensitivity" is another bogus diagnosis whose symptoms are said to be multiple and include fatigue, depression, inability to concentrate, hyperactivity, headaches, skin problems (including hives), abdominal pain and bloating, constipation, diarrhea, respiratory symptoms, and problems of the urinary and reproductive organs. The main promoter of "candidiasis hypersensitivity" has been William G. Crook, M.D., of Jackson, Tennessee, who wrote and published The Yeast Connection. According to Crook, "If a careful checkup doesn't reveal the cause for your symptoms, and your medical history is typical, it's possible or even probable that your health problems are yeast-connected." To correct these alleged problems, he recommends allergenic extracts, antifungal drugs, vitamin and mineral supplements, and diets that avoid refined carbohydrates, processed foods, and (initially) fruits and milk.

FTC Dietary Supplement Advertising Cases 1984 to July 2003, 5/6/2011
Nature's Way Products, Inc., 113 F.T.C. 293 (1990) (consent agreement and $30,000 to National Institutes of Health for research in candidiasis) (Cantrol capsules to control yeast infections; Cantrol’s diagnostic yeast test can demonstrate that a person is likely to have a yeast infection)

An Irreverent Look at the Vitamin Bible and Its Author (Earl Mindell), 4/4/2008
Flyers #9A and #9B endorse the theory of Dr. Benjamin Frank that increasing intake of RNA and DNA through dietary measures or supplements will “reverse the aging process.” Nucleic acids, found in all living matter, are basic to cell reproduction. Like SOD, however, those that are eaten are digested and never reach the cells intact. Moreover, nucleic acids are like specific blueprints. If DNA and RNA from yeasts or sardines could actually work in humans, they would turn them into young yeasts or baby sardines

Herbert, Sharp, & Gaudiano - Autism, 14/1/2006
Candidiasis is an infection caused by an overgrowth of candida in the body. Women often contract yeast infections during their childbearing years. In addition, antibiotic medication can disrupt the natural balance among microorganisms in the body, resulting in an overgrowth of candida (Adams & Conn, 1997). In the 1980s, anecdotal reports began to emerge suggesting that some children with candidiasis later developed symptoms of autism. Supporters of this theory point to animal studies in which candida was shown to produce toxins that disrupted the immune system, leading to the possibility of brain damage (Rimland, 1988). Furthermore, Rimland speculated that perhaps 5 to 10% of autistic children could show improved functioning if treated for candida infection.

Proponents often recommend that Nystatin, a medication used to treat women with yeast infections, be given to children whose mothers had candidiasis during pregnancy, whether or not the children show signs of infection. However, there is no evidence that mothers of autistic children have a higher incidence of candidiasis than mothers in the general population and only uncontrolled case reports are presented as evidence for the etiological role of candida infection in autism (Siegel, 1996).

There is currently no empirical support for theories that implicate unloving mothers, yeast infections, or childhood vaccinations as the cause of autism. The evidence invoked in support of these claims involves uncontrolled case studies and anecdotal reports.

Rebuttal of Timothy N. Gorski, M.D., 17/12/2005
I am very grateful that the Honorable Congressman Burton raised the matter of red yeast rice as an alternative to prescription "statin" drugs. This is yet another excellent example of how DSHEA has corrupted the law and, with it, the understanding of Americans with respect to products promoted as having health benefits. For on the one hand was the "drug" lovastatin, sold under the trade name Mevacor®, which the FDA requires be proven safe and effective for its intended purpose before marketing. On the other hand was the "dietary supplement" lovastatin, sold under the trade name Cholestin®

There exist many published reports of experiments in which persons were able to influence a variety of cellular and other biological systems through mental means. The target systems for these investigations have included bacteria, yeast, fungi, mobile algae, plants, protozoa, larvae, insects, chicks, mice, rats, gerbils, cats, and dogs, as well as cellular preparations (blood cells, neurons, cancer cells) and enzyme activities. In human "target persons," eye movements, muscular movements, electrodermal activity, plethysmographic activity, respiration, and brain rhythms have been affected through direct mental influence.

Details concerning this astonishingly irrational form of medical quackery, including the locations of the "Master Allergy Reflexes," the "Metabolic Reflex," the "Yeast Reflex," the "Hemoglobin Reflex," and additional "reflexes" especially relevant for the flu season, can be found at http://www.crahealth.org (click on "CRA and Syndromes"). On this same website can be found Dr. Warren lengthy statement of enthusiastic belief in CRA as well as the healing powers of "God, chiropractic, CRA-based nutrition, dentistry and osteopathy."

Quackwatch, 22/11/2014
"Candidiasis Hypersensitivity/Yeast Allergy" (updated 10/8/05)

Dubious Diagnostic Tests, 14/9/2014
Candida Yeast Test ("spit test")

"Yeast test" questionnaires

A Close Look at Naturopathy, 26/11/2013
The AANP published the Journal of Naturopathic Medicine six times between 1990 and 1996. The issues ran from about 80 to 100 pages. The third issue was devoted to "Non-Standard HIV/ARC/AIDS Management." The fifth, which attacked immunization, contained papers suggesting that vaccines may be a factor in causing cancer and that homeopathic prophylaxis using nosodes would be effective and safer than standard vaccines. (Nosodes are homeopathic products made from pathological organs or tissues: causative agents such as bacteria, fungi, ova, parasites, virus particles and yeast; disease products; or excretions. There is no scientific evidence that nosodes are effective, and the FDA has ordered several manufactures to stop making preventive claims for them. The sixth issue of the journal promoted the use of "natural" products for cancer and contained an absurd article claiming that measuring the electrical resistance of the skin may be a useful way to diagnose the early stages of cancer and AIDS.

William Crook's fad diagnosis of "candidiasis hypersensitivity" and includes Crook's three-page questionnaire for determining the probability that "yeast-connected problems are present." The questionnaire does not have the slightest validity.

The Medical Messiahs: Chapter 16, 12/9/2012
Since advertising techniques had just reached the stage to make the most of such an opportunity, Americans, during the prosperity decade, were constantly besought to buy physical well-being and to banish ailments by eating cheese, bread, and cereals, by imbibing milk and carbonated drinks. Yeast and chocolate bars vaunted their vitamin content. Vitamin pills, like Mastin's Vitamon Tablets—"Give You That Firm Flesh Pep"—received a big play. And cod liver oil, long a staple in the proprietary field, enjoyed a new vogue with the discovery that it was a source of vitamin D. So-called extracts of this oil were promoted with claims that the vitamin value was retained while the fishy taste was banished .

Another forum for nutritional pitchmen who possessed hortatorical skill was the lecture platform. Gayelord Hauser, a suave and talented performer, revived in the 1930's the ancient art of the popular health lecture course. Heralded by advertising, the course began with a free lecture or so, continued for a fee. Hauser, a man on cordial terms with American movie stars and English nobility, lauded five "wonder" foods-skim milk, brewer's yeast, wheat germ, yogurt, and blackstrap molasses-and touted his own writings on nutrition. His appeal was amazing. When Look Younger, Live Longer was published in 1950, the book stayed on best seller lists for over a year and during that time sold a third of a million copies .

Why Ear Candling Is Not a Good Idea, 19/5/2010
Most instructions direct the person undergoing the procedure to lie on his or her side. A collecting plate is placed above the ear, and the candle is inserted through a hole in the plate and into the ear canal. The candle is lit, and as the wick burns down, it is often trimmed. Some advocate using a toothpick to maintain a hole in the top of the hollow candle throughout the procedure. After the candle is blown out and removed, a cotton swab is used to gently remove visible earwax from the ear, and "ear oil" is often applied. Some practitioners place the still-hot candle in a bowl of water, and claim that everything in it which is not obviously beeswax is earwax, toxins, dead skin, drug residues, or remnants of past yeast infections, none of which has been verified. Nearly all package directions indicate that the ear will feel warm but not hot, and that the experience will be relaxing or even spiritual in nature.

Early in 1998, the FDA ordered the president of Earth Care, of Ukiah, California, to stop marketing the Ear Candles advertised in his company's catalog. The letter noted that the product had been advertised as a "remedy for earaches, sinus headaches, swimmer's ear, allergies, and hearing difficulty effectively removes impurities from the passages by drawing excess wax, yeast, fungus, and bacteria . . . from the sinuses and lymph glands." In September 1998, the agency issued an Import Alert which stated:

Why Ear Candling Is Not a Good Idea, 19/5/2010
Most instructions direct the person undergoing the procedure to lie on his or her side. A collecting plate is placed above the ear, and the candle is inserted through a hole in the plate and into the ear canal. The candle is lit, and as the wick burns down, it is often trimmed. Some advocate using a toothpick to maintain a hole in the top of the hollow candle throughout the procedure. After the candle is blown out and removed, a cotton swab is used to gently remove visible earwax from the ear, and "ear oil" is often applied. Some practitioners place the still-hot candle in a bowl of water, and claim that everything in it which is not obviously beeswax is earwax, toxins, dead skin, drug residues, or remnants of past yeast infections, none of which has been verified. Nearly all package directions indicate that the ear will feel warm but not hot, and that the experience will be relaxing or even spiritual in nature.

Early in 1998, the FDA ordered the president of Earth Care, of Ukiah, California, to stop marketing the Ear Candles advertised in his company's catalog. The letter noted that the product had been advertised as a "remedy for earaches, sinus headaches, swimmer's ear, allergies, and hearing difficulty effectively removes impurities from the passages by drawing excess wax, yeast, fungus, and bacteria . . . from the sinuses and lymph glands." In September 1998, the agency issued an Import Alert which stated:

OTA Report:Herbal Treatments, 13/1/2006
The current Hoxsey treatment offered by Mildred Nelson at the Bio-Medical Center in Tijuana includes a liquid tonic, a salve, and a powder, all of which are reportedly based on Hoxsey's formulas. The current patient literature from Nelson's clinic lists the components of the liquid herbal tonic as: "potassium iodide and herbs, licorice, red clover, cascara, burdock root, barberis root (sic), poke root and stillingia root" (78). The ingredients of the salve and powder are not given. In addition, Nelson's treatment regimen specifically includes nutritional supplements and dietary restrictions. Nelson advises before-meal "tri-tabs," after-meal tablets, yeast tablets, vitamin C, calcium capsules, laxative tablets, antiseptic douches, and antiseptic washes. She also recommends that patients exclude certain foods that "nullify the tonic" (663), such as pork, tomatoes, pickles or other products with vinegar, salt, sugar, artificial sweeteners, alcohol, carbonated beverages, and bleached flour. All patients tested for systemic infection with the fungus Candida albicans before treatment is initiated, although the reasons for such testing are not given in the patient literature (78). Treatment lasts up to three days at the clinic, with followup visits within three to six months after the initial visit.

According to a report of the Swiss Cancer League (847), fermented Iscador products contain large numbers of both dead and live bacteria (mainly Lactobacillus) and some yeast (847). Proponents contest that assertion, noting that Iscador is filtered to eliminate bacteria and that routine testing is conducted for microbial contamination, as required by the Swiss International Office for Drug Control (723). Iscador preparations are also tested for endotoxin contamination (367). No cases of serious infection have been reported in the literature as a result of subcutaneous injection of Iscador.

Amazing Claims for Chlorophyll, 4/2/2005
"Oh no," I said, looking at the bottle she handed me. The label read Octocosonal, a product marketed by another company. "This seems a bit expensive," I said, looking at the $5.95 price tag. "According to the label, this whole bottle contains only 30 thousandths of 1 gram of an alcohol taken out of yeast and put into a pill. Couldn't I just eat the yeast?"

License Revocation of James E. Johnson, M.D, 27/11/2004
In March 2003, the Tennessee Court of Appeals upheld a ruling of the Tennessee Board of Medicine to revoke the license of James E. Johnson, M.D., who practiced "alternative medicine" in Nashville, Tennessee. The board had found Johnson guilty of unprofessional conduct in connection with a patient whom he had incorrectly diagnosed as having a widespread yeast infection. Following treatment with garlic, intravenous hydrogen peroxide infusions, and high-dose vitamin C injections, the patient had developed a baseball-size abscess that required surgery. The case is important because it affirms the principle that regardless of how they label themselves, all physicians are obligated to meet appropriate standards of care.

After examining E.H., Johnson diagnosed her as having candidiasis, an infestation or overgrowth of yeast in her bloodstream and body. He initially prescribed garlic treatment to cure E.H.'s candidiasis. E. H., however, sought a "faster" remedy.

Disciplinary Action against Paula Bickle (1998), 30/5/2004
(b) Respondent diagnosed Patient Three as possibly having Epstein Barr or chronic fatigue syndrome, thyroid problems, paramenopausal syndrome, an allergy problem, a systemic yeast infection, a low-grade infection due to dental work, and a mineral deficiency.

indicating too much yeast in her system, and told Patient Three that her body was working hard to fight off this invasion."

Radio Infomercial with Seasilver's Robert Friedman, D.C., 26/2/2004
Warburg was awarded the Nobel Prize for discovering the cause of cancer. He found that the growth of cancer is initiated by a lack of oxygen in the cells. He concluded that cancer cannot live in an oxygen-rich environment. Other experts have linked many other diseases to a lack of oxygen, including AIDS, allergies, yeast infections, chronic fatigue syndrome and even arthritis.

Seasilver uses only boiled inner bark Pau D'Arco. Pau D'Arco, interestingly, is completely resistant to fungus and mold spores and it's been effectively used by people to help control yeast infections and even some form of allergies. As a matter of fact, in South America, they're actually curing cancer by drinking Pau D'Arco tea. And speaking of cancer, in the 1970s, the National Cancer Institute reported that Pau D'Arco's main ingredient is a powerful, natural antibiotic that has virus-killing properties. Dr. Norman Farnsworth from the University of Illinois confirmed these claims and stated that Pau D'Arco contains compounds which seem to attack the cause of cancer.

A Skeptical Look at Monte Kline and Pacific Health Center, 21/8/2014
Monte Kline, doing business as Pacific Health Center (PHC), operates clinics in Sisters and Clakamas, Oregon. He states he has been a clinical nutritionist for more than 30 years. He has described his practice as "a nonmedical health practice working with natural healing methods from a Christian perspective." He sometimes refers to himself as "Dr. Kline." The "Sick and Tired Webinar" video on the clinic Web site states that the clinic offers a natural way to deal with fatigue, allergies, arthritis, PMS, menopausal problems, prostate problems, depression, Candida yeast-related problems, fibromyalgia, headaches, high blood pressure, low blood sugar, diabetes, infertility, memory loss, and many other problems—a list that Kline says "could go on and on."

Index to "Fad" Diagnoses, 3/7/2014
Candidiasis hypersensitivity ("yeast allergy")

A Critical Look at "Dr." Robert Young's Theories and Credentials, 6/2/2014
The same observations apply equally to The pH Miracle, which contains so many dubious passages that it would take a book to respond to them all. Young bases his notions about alkaline nutrition on the writings of Antoine Bechamp (1822-1895), and Gunter Enderlein (1872-1968), who held that microorganisms do not have fixed structures but arise from smaller entities that are always present but shift their form and function in response to environmental influences. The Youngs refer to the alleged entities as "microforms" or "microzymas." Page 21 of The pH Miracle states that "all cells evolve from them to begin with" and that "red blood cells . . . can de-evolve and then re-evolve into any cell the body needs." They also state that "morbid changes in microforms" are spurred by body acidity and that "harmful pleomorphic organisms do not, and cannot evolve in healthy (alkaline) surroundings." They further claim to have videotaped transformations from bacteria to yeast, fungus, and mold and back again. Page 32 of the book claims that "acidification and overgrowth of negative microforms in the body are the root cause of every symptom, illness and disease." However, the notion of pleomorphism is unfounded and was abandoned by the scientific community long ago.

A Critical Look at Gary Null's Activities and Credentials, 16/1/2014
Over the years, Null has marketed a variety of supplement products. In the mid-1980s, his catalog included: Guard-Ion (an antioxidant formula claimed to help protect athletes from free radicals the body can't control), Gary Null's AM-PM Vitamin-Mineral Formula (a "revolutionary breakthrough in vitamin preparation" that provides the nutrients needed at the best times for the body's anabolic and catabolic activities), Candida Complex (to bolster the body's defenses against yeast infection), Endurance Factor (containing "all the nutrients and enzymes that have made Bee Pollen famous"), Energy Plus (a royal jelly tablet), Rebalancer (a "cleansing formulation" for adults exposed to air pollutants, pesticides, or preservatives, or who have "internal metabolic imbalances"), CoEnzyme Q10 ("may reverse deficiencies and improve organ function, especially in the heart), Sport DMG (an N,N Dimethylglycine product to "improve cardiovascular function and to enhance the body's natural immune response system), and Gary Null's Immune Nutrients ("to nourish and stimulate immune function, not merely at a marginal level of preventing disease and degeneration, but a positive level of striving for wellness and excellence, for optimal health").


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