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Dictionary of Metaphysical Healthcare

Unnaturalistic Methods: O

© 1997 Jack Raso, M.S., R.D.

occult medicine: Field that apparently encompasses astrology, aura analysis, biorhythm, Christian Science, clairvoyant diagnosis, faith healing, Kirlian photography, medical graphology, mesmerism, palmistry, shamanism, TCM, and witchcraft.
Ohashiatsu®: Combination of shiatsu, physical exercises, and meditation developed by Japanese-born Wataru Ohashi, author of The Ohashi Bodywork Book: Beyond Shiatsu with the Ohashiatsu® Method. Ohashi founded the Ohashi Institute, in New York City, in 1974. Ohashiatsu purportedly integrates and rejuvenates body, mind, and spirit.
Oki-Do (Okido, Okido way of living): Purported "natural way to ultimate health." It draws from Chinese Chikwando, macrobiotics, tai chi, Tibetan medicine, yoga, and Zen, and it encompasses Oki-Do Shiatsu, Oki-Do Yoga, and Shinkiko.
Okinawan karate (Shorin Ryu karate): Meditative form of karate that, purportedly, frees the minds of practitioners, nourishes their spirits, and strengthens their bodies. "Shorin Ryu" is the technical name for a style and school of Okinawan karate.
OMEGA: Alleged means of "energy transfer" akin to Reiki. The OMEGA practitioner simply places his or her hands on or near various areas of the client's body.
OMNI-FORCE: Modular mail-order program developed by Gérard V. Sunnen, a psychiatrist, hypnotist, and reputed world-renowned expert in Eastern medicine. The program reportedly involves self-hypnosis and acupressure. Supposedly, it releases one's "inner powers" and enables users to "recharge" their "energy" and direct "healing energy" to any part of the body.
One Brain: Derivative of Three in One. One Brain is an "Emotional Stress Diffusion technique." It includes "Age Recession" and "Precision Muscle Testing" (see "muscle testing").
Open Mind programming (Open Mind advanced programming): Use of Open Mind "soundtracks," a group of musical audiocassettes, to obtain things missing from one's life, such as a great body, high self-esteem, love, money, or a "super IQ." The tapes reportedly contain "success affirma tions."
Optimum Health Balance: Offshoot of applied kinesiology developed by Charles Benham. Practitioners place "remedies" or "supplements" on clients, supposedly to channel the "energy patterns" of such things.
organic process therapy (OPT): Purported way to rediscover one's "body-feelings," mind, and spirit, and to return to one's unobstructed, unfractured "Organic Self."
organismic psychotherapy (humanistic body psychotherapy): Spinoff of Reichian Therapy developed by Malcolm Brown, Ph.D., and Katherine Ennis Brown, in Europe. Its theory divides human anatomy into four "dynamic Being Centers" of the "embodied soul": (1) The Agape-Eros Being Center consists of the upper frontal portion of the body and purportedly mediates feelings of openness toward others. (2) the Hara Being Center, the abdominal portion of the body, supposedly permits self-love. (3) The Logos Being Center, the upper dorsal portion of the body, allegedly has unfathomable intuitive faculties. (4) The Phallic-Spiritual Warrior Being Center, which consists of the lower back and the limbs, supposedly enables resoluteness (perseverance).
orgone therapy (medical orgone therapy, medical orgonomy, orgonomic medicine, orgonomic medicine therapy): System developed by psychoanalyst Wilhelm Reich (1897-1957), who coined the word "orgone" to refer to his hypothetical fundamental, omnipresent, life-sustaining, intelligent radia tion. Orgone therapy encompasses the Reich Blood Test and Reichian Therapy. The professional activities of medical orgonomists include administering "orgone charged" water and applying the following devices. The orgone field meter and the vacor tube contribute to pseudodiagnosis. The meter al legedly shows the extent and strength of the patient's "orgone energy field." The vacor tube is an "orgone charged" glass vacuum tube that supposedly glows under the influence of the patient's "orgone energy field." The "medical dor-buster" purportedly siphons a toxic form of orgone—"dor" (an acronym for "deadly orgone")—from the patient's body.
oriental body and facial diagnosis: Ancient "art" taught by author Steven Acuff. One of its principles is that "life energy" is balance or imbalance of "the polarity between" yin and yang.
Oriental Bodywork: Apparently, a group of methods, including acupressure massage and Jin Shin Acupressure, used to stimulate "natural self-curative" abilities. Its theory posits a spirit and bodily "pathways of energy."
oriental massage (amma massage): Form of massage that emphasizes alleged acupuncture meridians, through which the body's "vital energy force" is channeled. Oriental massage and amma probably are identical.
Oriental medicine: In general, the use of acupuncture, "Chinese herbal combinations," diet, and "emotional changes" with the purported aim of eliminating problems with meridians ("invisible energy pathways").
Oriental 7-Day Quick Weight-0ff Diet (Oriental Diet, Oriental diet plan, Oriental diet system, Oriental Miracle Diet, Oriental quick weight loss diet, Oriental quick weight loss plan, Oriental 7-day diet, Oriental 7-day miracle diet, Oriental 7-day plan, 7-day miracle diet, 7-day Oriental diet, 7-day Oriental food plan, 7-day Oriental miracle diet, 7-day Oriental quick weight loss diet, 7-day Oriental reducing diet): "Reducing strategy" originated by "mystical philosopher" Anthony Norvell (deceased), author of Norvell's Dynamic Mental Laws for Successful Living (1965), Meta-Physics: New Dimensions of the Mind (1967), Cosmic Magnetism: The Miracle of the Magic Power Circle (1970), Mind Cosmology (1971), Occult Sciences: How to Get What You Want Through Your Occult Powers (1971), The Miracle Power of Transcendental Meditation (1972), One Hundred Thousand Dollar Dream and How to Make It Come True (1973), Universal Secrets of Telecosmic Power (1974), and The Oriental 7-Day Quick Weight-Off Diet (1975). The diet is a purported means of losing weight even if one eats as much as one wants. Norvell's theory held that brown rice is an amazing, God-given source of proteins that do not add to body weight.
Original Ingham Method (Ingham method, Ingham method of foot reflexology, Ingham technique, Original Ingham Method of Reflexology): Brand of reflexology promoted by the International Institute of Reflexology®, in St. Petersburg, Florida. The institute defines "reflexology" as "a science which deals with the principle that there are reflexes in the feet relative to each and every organ and all parts of the body." The Ingham method emerged from the work of Eunice D. Ingham Stopfel (1879-1974), author of Stories the Feet Can Tell (1938), and her nephew Dwight C. Byer, author of Better Health with Foot Reflexology. Ingham developed a style of Foot Reflexology she called the "Ingham Reflex Method of Compression Massage." In the 1930s, she "refined" zone theory (see "zone therapy") by mapping the feet with "organ reflexes" (e.g., the "heart reflex"). Allegedly, each of these areas is a conduit to a corresponding part of the body.
Orionic Healing System: Proponents describe this method as "
a systematic way of lifting limiting thoughts and negative patterns from one's cellular programming in the DNA, where cellular memory lives." They also say it is "a cutting edge method for changing consciousness by utilizing the upper chakra system, and other tools that reorganize one's frequency and functioning." Janna Zarchin, M.A., originated the system with help from Annie Schiavone, and Deborah Siegel Humanitzki, LPN.
Ortho-Bionomy (OB): System of "natural manipulative therapy" and self-healing developed by British osteopath Arthur Lincoln Pauls, who introduced it in the United States in 1976. Pauls, who reportedly believes in a "life force" or "life energy," has defined "ortho-bionomy" as "the correct ap plication of the laws of life." His system involves touching, dialogue, and instruction in common movements. Sessions may also include energy field work.
Orthopractic: "Holistic healing approach" promoted by Anthony Cimino, N.D., Ph.D., founder of the Long Island Biotherapy Center, in Syosset, New York. It apparently embraces acupressure, dianetics, hypnotherapy, muscle testing (see above), nutritional counseling, reflexology, and Neuro-Communica tion (Neuro-Communication Systems). Neuro-Communication, according to a Biotherapy Center leaflet, is a "process" discovered by Cimino that "asserts to better the nervous system through the use of special words and body movement."
Osteokinetics®: Alleged stimulation and "palpation" of bone by "qi-gong" ("vital life force energy") while muscles are in traction. It purportedly treats somatizations of emotionality and "psychology."
outer healing: Purported detoxification and "Rebuilding" through breathwork, diet, feng shui, "Hands-on-Healing" (see "bodywork"), herbs, "Lymphatic Therapy," and the removal of environmental toxins.

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